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    Module 4 - Diversity Management 1

    Published: January 23, 2023

    Module 4 - Diversity Management 1

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    Module 4 - Diversity Management 1

    • 1. IO3: Creation of Training Contents for Diversity Learning and Management IO3: Creation of Training Contents for Diversity Learning and Management Diversity Management 1
    • 2. Introduction Introduction Due to rising globalization, a more diverse workforce, and the complexity of occupations, diversity has recently started to play a major part in organizational life (Williams and O' Reilly, 1998). There are numerous ways to define variety. It has been defined variously by academics. Diversity was described by Cox (2001) as the variety of social and cultural identities shared by individuals within a specific workplace or marketing environment. Diversity management is a strategy used by organizations to encourage wider participation of employees from diverse backgrounds. It is a component of human resource management as its overall objective is to promote equality and diversity in the workplace by using policies and tactics that are sensitive to the social, cultural and ethnic diversity of employees. It is the process of creating and managing a diverse team and is vital in today's organizations. Professional fairness and equality can lead to more effective teams, higher employee morale and increased profitability. Managing diversity is vital in today's workplaces as workplace equity and diversity can lead to more productive teams, satisfied employees and increased income. Managing diversity can make all of this a reality, despite what may seem like an HR manager's dream. The number of organizations with a high diversity rate has increased in the business world in recent decades. Recognizing the diversity of staff based on socio-demographic characteristics and other factors is a key element of diversity in an organization (Workable survey, 2021).
    • 3. Diversity Management in the workplace Diversity Management in the workplace Managing diversity in the workplace refers to the process of developing an inclusive and diverse working environment. The unique contributions of each employee are valued so that the organization can progress and prosper as a result. The general assumption is that when employees from different backgrounds work together, creative problem-solving processes develop. This is partly due to an increase in diversity of views. Organizations can benefit from workplace diversity in a number of ways. Because of demographic shifts, globalization and digitization, workplace diversity may mostly be seen as a mirror of the more diverse nature of the world we live in. Following are some of the most important statistics findings from a Glassdoor study (Glassdoor team, September 30, 2020): -Businesses with a diverse and inclusive workforce are 33% more successful. -These businesses are also 1.7 times more likely to become industry innovators. -Finally, these businesses are also more likely to be able to attract top talent because 67% of job seekers care about diversity and inclusion. All employees should receive thorough diversity training as a starting point for organizations seeking to promote inclusion. Distributing multicultural competency training will support the mission and overall commitment to cultural competency. Combating stereotypes, minimizing microaggressions, intercultural communication, multicultural and multinational understanding, cultural awareness and inclusion, and inclusive management are just a few examples of diversity competencies.
    • 4. Slide4 Skills related to Diversity Management Frieda Edgette, a certified executive coach and organizational strategist, outlined how using empathy as a tool will help us embrace diversity in the workplace. She discussed the neurological and behavioral theories that underlie empathy, its critical importance in effective leadership in the public sector and presented useful techniques for fostering both individual and group empathy in the workplace.
    • 5. 5 ways to embrace Diversity with Empathy 5 ways to embrace Diversity with Empathy 1.Be authentic Look for ways to better grasp who you are. By investigating your identity, history, principles, and experiences, you can become more self-aware. 2.Self-manage What comes naturally to you when faced with opposition or conflict? Take note of your rational response. Create a technique for developing self-control. 3.Practice active listening Keep an eye out for verbal and non-verbal cues when engaging with others. Make careful to temporarily silence your inner monologue and concentrate solely on the other individual. Don't worry about not being able to react. This causes the brain's "mirror neurons," which are more likely to release oxytocin, the hormone that makes you happy. 4.Get curious Take on a growth mindset. Ask open-ended questions with a "what" or "how" term. What situations in the other person's life influenced them? What matters most to them? Your sole goal is to comprehend. More opportunities for problem-solving, creativity and interpersonal interactions might arise when you actively seek knowledge rather than simply expressing your own beliefs. 5.Respect, connect 99% of the DNA in the human population is the same. It's crucial to engage with people outside of work and public life and exchange experiences with them. We may increase communication and better connect, leading to improved communications and productivity, by being more open and supportive of one another.
    • 6. Slide6 Workshop Reflection of our biases towards different cultures
    • 7. Activity 1 Learning about Diversity through experiences Answer the following questions. If you prefer not to share your writing, we will explore diversity, bias, and intersectionality at the end of the exercise without mentioning what you wrote. This exercise can be carried out via the Slido tool for greater interaction. The answers given will be anonymous. Activity 1
    • 8. 1.  What  characteristics  best  describe  your  diversity,  in  your  opinion? They might be connected to your age, ability, culture, religion, ethnicity, or other part of who you are. 1. What characteristics best describe your diversity, in your opinion? They might be connected to your age, ability, culture, religion, ethnicity, or other part of who you are. 2. Have you ever experienced unfavorable treatment because of a personal trait? What occurred? How were you feeling? 3. Have you ever received favorable treatment because of a personal trait? What occurred? How were you feeling?
    • 9. Activity 2 Why cultural diversity matters Activity 2 Below you will watch a video entitled "Why cultural diversity matters". At the beginning of the video the speaker, Michael Gavin, presents 3 questions, express your feelings and your opinion on the answers given at the end of the video. Why cultural diversity matters | Michael Gavin | TEDxCSU - YouTube
    • 10. Activity 3 Improving communicatio n skills and unconscious bias the following Read scenarios. What are your feelings and reactions while reading each of them? This exercise can be carried out via the Miro whiteboard for greater interaction. Activity 3
    • 11. 1. You work in a transit hub with a colleague. A person enters your office and claims that he is experiencing facing problems with his roommates and wants to  transfer  to  a  different  room.  As  he  is  leaving,  your  colleague  says  to  you, "That man is going to keep having difficulties as long as he is dressing and acts that way". 1. You work in a transit hub with a colleague. A person enters your office and claims that he is experiencing facing problems with his roommates and wants to transfer to a different room. As he is leaving, your colleague says to you, "That man is going to keep having difficulties as long as he is dressing and acts that way". 2. We assume you are a white man. You are walking down the street and you see a black man talking with a white man intensely. People look at them strangely and some people comment negatively towards the black man without knowing what is going on. 3. You are talking to a person from another country about something and you have a different view and perspective on it. At the end of the conversation, he asks you to meet him for a beer someday to discuss and get to know you better.
    • 12. Slide12
    • 13. HP company HP company Hp launched its diversity management policies, which it referred to as "open corporate policy," from the beginning. Everyone in the organization wants to perform a good job, and their management approach is characterized as "management by strolling around" (Menke et al., 2006). Early on in HP's history, the open culture fostered a climate of trust and understanding because it was believed that this element was crucial for a successful business. In 1957, the year the business went public, Hewlett and Packard formally established the Hp Way (Dong, 2002). The five enduring organizational principles, seven corporate objectives, and a variety of initiatives and activities make up the Hp Way, the distinctive corporate culture of HP (Menke et al., 2006). Trust and respect, high standards of success and contribution, unwavering integrity, teamwork, and flexibility and creativity are the five organizational ideals. Profit, consumers, areas of interest, growth, people, management, and citizenship are the seven business aims. Management by Objective, Management by Walking Around, and Open Corporate Policy are among the strategies and techniques.
    • 14. Slide14
    • 15. HP company HP company According to HP, "diversity" refers to the presence of numerous distinctive persons in the workforce, marketplace, and community. This covers both males and females from various countries, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, backgrounds, talents, and abilities, in addition to all the other distinctive qualities that each employee possesses. By "inclusion," HP refers to a work environment where each person is appreciated for his or her unique abilities, experiences, and perspectives and where everyone has the chance to fully contribute to achieving company success. Creating a worldwide community where HP connects everyone and everything through its products, services, and successful employees is another aspect of inclusion. In fact, the organization is built on a foundation of inclusiveness and diversity (Hp, 2008). At HP, it is understandable that fostering a diverse and inclusive workplace requires ongoing renewal. As the process continues into the 21st century, it is crucial to keep in mind the significance of each phase. Together, the actions form a diversity value chain that the company is using to develop a successful global workforce and workplace.
    • 16. Slide16 Additional Materials
    • 17. Diversity Games for the Workplace Diversity Games for the Workplace -Diversity Thumball Use the Diversity Thumball game to start a conversation about diversity. The rules are as follows: oThere is a meaningful prompt intended to get your staff chatting on each panel of the ball. oTo answer the question the ball landed on, ask the person who has it to do so. oKeep passing the ball around the classroom, responding to the questions as you go, until every person has taken part. This game is a fantastic method to have relaxed conversations on a number of challenging subjects. The game deals on a number of important diversity issues, such as: How to listen and reply in a way that validates and makes others feel heard. How to criticize ideas, not individuals. Putting an end to unnecessary personal assaults. Respectfully recognizing when you disagree. Participants will leave this diversity game with a stronger understanding of embracing diversity and a better understanding of their coworkers.
    • 18. Diversity Games for the Workplace Diversity Games for the Workplace -I Am, But I Am Not I Am, But I Am Not directly confronting myths. The rules are as follows: oGive every person a piece of paper and a writing item. oAsk them to make two columns, one labeled "But I Am Not," and the other "I Am." oAsk them to complete the columns with accurate self-descriptions. Someone might write, "I am a male, yet I am not emotionless" for instance. Alternately, "I may be a woman, but I am not weak". oTo get a fantastic discussion on diversity going, ask people to give their responses. It's crucial to show consideration and kindness when people agree not to share these answers because they can be fairly private.
    • 19. Slide19 CDHU (culturallydiverse.eu)