UPLOAD

    Muhammad Javed

    Lahore, Pakistan

    4.6K

    Modes of transport

    Published: September 15, 2018

    Modes of transport

    Comments

    Modes of transport

    • 1. MODES of  Transport MODES of Transport
    • 2. 5. Air Transport 5. Air Transport ■Context •Air routes are practically unlimited: •North Atlantic. •Inside North America and Europe. •Over the North Pacific. •Inside Asia. •Multidimensional constraints: •Site (a commercial plane needs about 3,300 meters of track for landing and take off). •Climate, fog and aerial currents. •Air activities are linked to the tertiary and quaternary sectors: •Finance and tourism that require movements of people. •Accommodating growing quantities of high value freight.
    • 3. 5. Air Transport 5. Air Transport ■Air Space •Segment of the atmosphere that is under the jurisdiction of a nation or under an international agreement for its use. •Two major components: •Land-based; takeoffs and landings. •Air-based; composed of air corridors. •Air corridors can superimpose themselves to altitudes up to 22,500 meters. •Limited to the use of predetermined corridors. ■Air space use •Air space exclusively belongs to the country under it. •Access to the land and air-based components is dependent on agreements between nations and airline companies. •Air freedom rights.
    • 4. Air Freedom Rights Air Freedom Rights First Second Home Country A Country B Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Seventh Eight Ninth
    • 5. 5. Air Transport 5. Air Transport ■Development of air transportation •Technical improvements: •Jet engine considerably reduced distances, namely because of greater speeds and improved ranges. •Almost every part of the world can be serviced in less than 24 hours. •Rising affluence: •Linked with income and economic output growth. •Disposable income available for leisure. •International tourism and air transportation are mutually interdependent. •Globalization: •Trade networks established by multinational corporations. •About 40% of the value of global manufactured exports. •About 50% of the value of American overseas - non-NAFTA - exports.
    • 6. Main Commercial Passenger Aircraft, 1935-2006 Main Commercial Passenger Aircraft, 1935-2006
    • 7. Early Intercontinental Air Routes, 1930s Sharjah Early Intercontinental Air Routes, 1930s Dakar Tangier Casablanca Agadir Natal Rio de Janeiro Buenos Aires Santiago Punta Arenas Alicante Marseilles Lisbon Azores New York Botwood Eyeries London Paris Brindisi Wadi Halfa Khartoum Juba Nairobi Mbeya Harare Johannesburg Cape Town Cairo Alexandria Athens Jask Gwadar Karachi Jodhpur Calcutta Allhahabad Rangoon Bangkok Alur Setar Basra Baghdad Kuwait Medan Singapore Palembang Jakarta Surabaya Kupang Waingapu Darwin Katherine Mount Isa Brisbane Sydney Charleville Longreach Dayr az Zawr Gaza Amsterdam Imperial Airways African Route (c1933) Imperial Airways/Quantas Australian Route (c1934) Aeropostale (1930) Pan American Transatlantic Route (1939) KLM Amsterdam – Jakarta (1935) Toulouse Akyab
    • 8. Flight Times by Piston and Jet Engines from Chicago Flight Times by Piston and Jet Engines from Chicago Piston Engine Jet Engine 10 hours 15 hours 20 hours 24 hours 30 hours 40 hours 10 hours 15 hours 20 hours 24 hours
    • 9. Average Airfare (roundtrip) between New York and London, 1946-2004 Average Airfare (roundtrip) between New York and London, 1946-2004
    • 10. Range from New York of Different Modern Commercial Jet Planes Range from New York of Different Modern Commercial Jet Planes B-747-400 (11,400 km) B-777-100 (7,400 km) A-320 (3,700 km)
    • 11. World Air Travel and World Air Freight Carried, 1950-2002 World Air Travel and World Air Freight Carried, 1950-2002
    • 12. 5. Air Transport 5. Air Transport ■Airline companies •Highly capital intensive segment of transport services. •Labor intensive, with limited room to lessen those labor requirements. •Around 900 airlines operating 11,600 commercial aircrafts. •Average number of 200 seats per plane. •Dominant share of the traffic is assumed by large passengers and freight carriers. ■Strategic alliances •Joint booking systems, exchange of shares, and a reorganization of their services in order to minimize redundancy. •Increased market dominance but also increased competition between major markets.
    • 13. World’s 10 Largest Passengers Airlines, 2000 (in 1,000 passengers) World’s 10 Largest Passengers Airlines, 2000 (in 1,000 passengers)
    • 14. World’s 10 Largest Freight Airlines, 2000 (in 1,000 tons) World’s 10 Largest Freight Airlines, 2000 (in 1,000 tons)
    • 15. Market Share of World Airline Traffic, 2003 Market Share of World Airline Traffic, 2003
    • 16. 5. Air Transport 5. Air Transport ■Flows •1.4 billion passengers traveled by air transport (2000). •2.8 billion departures and arrivals supported by airports. •Equivalent of 23% of the global population. •30 million tons of freight were transported. •Air traffic is globally highly imbalanced: •Distribution of the population. •Unequal levels of development. •Concentration of traffic in a limited number of hubs. •80% of the global population lives in the Northern Hemisphere: •Air traffic is much denser north of the equator. •North America and Europe accounted for 70.4% of all passenger movements in 2000.
    • 17. Major Air Traffic Flows Between Regions, 2000 (% of IATA Scheduled Passengers) Major Air Traffic Flows Between Regions, 2000 (% of IATA Scheduled Passengers) 35.5 23.2 15.9 3.2 1.3 1.1 2.6 1.5 3.9 1.9 1.3 1.8 1.7 1.7 North America Central America South America Africa Europe Middle East Asia Southwest Pacific 1.7
    • 18. 6. Modal Competition 6. Modal Competition ■Integrated transportation systems •Requires maximum flexibility. •Modal competition exists at various degrees and takes several dimensions. •Modes can compete or complement each other: •Cost, speed, accessibility, frequency, safety, comfort, etc. •Intermodal transportation: •Opened many opportunities for complementarity. •Intense competition over many modes in the transport chain.
    • 19. Four Travel Options between New York and Boston, 2004 Four Travel Options between New York and Boston, 2004
    • 20. 6. Modal Competition 6. Modal Competition ■Three dimensions of modal competition •Modal usage: •Comparative advantage of using a specific or a combination of modes. •Distance remains one of the basic determinant of modal usage. •The basic determinants of modal usage for passengers transportation. •For a similar distance, costs, speed and comfort can be significant factors. •Infrastructure usage: •Competition resulting from the presence of freight and passenger traffic on the same itineraries linking the same nodes. •Market area: •Competition being experienced between transport terminals for allocating new space or capturing new markets.
    • 21. Modal Competition Modal Competition A B Mode 1 2 3 A B Infrastructure / Route A B A B 4 5 6 A B Market Area
    • 22. Passenger Transport by Mode, Japan, 1950-1999 Passenger Transport by Mode, Japan, 1950-1999
    • 23. B – Intermodal Transportation B – Intermodal Transportation ■1. Intermodalism ■2. Containerization ■3. Modal Choice and Intermodal Transport Costs
    • 24. 1. Intermodalism 1. Intermodalism ■Integrated transport systems •Use of at least two different modes in a trip from origin to destination through an intermodal transport chain. •Brought about in part by technology. •Techniques for transferring freight from one mode to another have facilitated intermodal transfers. •The container has been the major development: •Becoming a privileged mode of shipping for rail and maritime transportation.
    • 25. Intermodal Transport Chain Intermodal Transport Chain Composition Connection Interchange Decomposition Local / Regional Distribution National / International Distribution Transport Terminal
    • 26. 40-Foot Containers Doublestacked on a Rail Car 40-Foot Containers Doublestacked on a Rail Car
    • 27. Multimodal and Intermodal Transportation Multimodal and Intermodal Transportation A C D F E B Multimodal Point-to-Point Network A C D F E B Intermodal Integrated Network Rail Road Transshipment Transshipment
    • 28. 2. Containerization 2. Containerization ■Container •Load unit that can be used by several transport modes. •Usable by maritime, railway and road modes. •Foremost expression on intermodal transportation. •Rectangular shape that can easily be handled. •Reference size is the Twenty-foot Equivalent Unit (TEU). •The most common container is the 40 footer (12 meters)
    • 29. 2. Containerization 2. Containerization ■Advantages of containers •Standard transport product: •Can be manipulated anywhere in the world (ISO standard). •All segments of the industry have access to the standard. •Specialized ships, trucks and wagons. •Flexibility of usage: •Transport a wide variety of goods ranging. •Raw materials, manufactured goods, cars to frozen products. •Liquids (oil and chemical products). •Perishable food products (“reefers”; 50% of all refrigerated cargo). •Management: •Unique identification number and a size type code. •Transport management no not in terms of loads, but in terms of unit.
    • 30. 2. Containerization 2. Containerization •Costs: •Low transport costs, •Speed: •Transshipment operations are minimal and rapid. •Containerships are on average 35% (19 knots versus 14 knots) faster than regular freighter ships. •Warehousing: •Its own warehouse. •Simpler and less expensive packaging. •Stacking capacity on ships, trains (doublestacking) and on the ground. •Security: •Contents of the container is unknown to shippers. •Can only be opened at the origin, at customs and at the destination. •Spoilage and losses (theft), especially those of valued commodities, are therefore reduced.
    • 31. Five Generations of Containerships  First Generation (1956-1970) Converted Tanker Second Generation (1970-1980) Cellular Containership Third Generation (1980-1988) Panamax Class Fourth Generation (1988-2000) Post Panamax Plus Fifth Generation (2000-?) Post Panamax Converted Cargo Vessel Five Generations of Containerships TEU Length 135 m 200 m 500 800 215 m 1,000 – 2,500 250 m 3,000 290 m 4,000 275 – 305 m 4,000 – 5,000 335 m 5,000 – 8,000 Draft < 9 m 10 m 11-12 m 11-13 m 13-14 m
    • 32. Stacked 40-Foot Containers Stacked 40-Foot Containers
    • 33. 20-Foot Container on Truck 20-Foot Container on Truck
    • 34. 20-Foot Tank Containers 20-Foot Tank Containers
    • 35. 40’ Reefer 40’ Reefer
    • 36. “Kegger” “Kegger”
    • 37. 4th Generation Containership 4th Generation Containership
    • 38. 2. Containerization 2. Containerization ■Disadvantages •Consumption of space. •Infrastructure costs: •Container handling infrastructures, such as giant cranes, warehousing facilities and inland road and rail access, represent important investments for port authorities and load centers. •Stacking. •Management logistics: •Requires management and tracking of every container. •Empty travel. •Illicit trade: •Common instrument used in the illicit trade of drug and weapons, as well as for illegal immigration. •Worries about the usage of containers for terrorism.
    • 39. 3. Modal Choice and Intermodal Transport Costs 3. Modal Choice and Intermodal Transport Costs ■Modal choice •Relationship between transport costs, distance and modal choice: •Road transport is usually used for short distances (from 500 to 750 km). •Railway transport for average distances. •Maritime transport for long distances (about 750 km). •Intermodalism: •The opportunity to combine modes. •Find a less costly alternative than an unimodal solution. •Efficiency of contemporary transport systems: •Capacity to route freight. •Capacity to transship it.
    • 40. Distance, Modal Choice and Transport Costs  Distance Transport costs per unit Road Rail Maritime D1 D2 C1 C2 C3 Distance, Modal Choice and Transport Costs
    • 41. Intermodal Transportation Cost Function Intermodal Transportation Cost Function Costs Origin Destination Composition Connection Connection Interchange Decomposition C(T) Transshipment C(cp) C(cn) C(I) C(cn) C(dc) Local / Regional Distribution Cost National / International Distribution Cost